Number Of Horses Placed In A Race

0
444
Horse racing chatter

Many of our customers like to make each-way bets on horse racing. How many places are paid out on each race? It depends on the number of runners in the race.

Join RaceBets And Claim Your Welcome Bonus Now!

The Numbers

If there are only two, three or four horses, then only first place gets paid out. If there are five, six or seven runners, the first two places are paid out. With eight, nine, ten, eleven, twelve, thirteen, fourteen and fifteen runners, three places are paid out. With sixteen or more runners, four places are paid out.

You will sometimes find that we are paying out five places on some of the biggest and most important races of the year. This can make your each-way bets exceptionally good value, so do watch out for our boosted place offers.

Winnings

How do you work out your potential winnings, with an each-way bet? Let’s say that you want to back a horse at odds of 10.00 (9/1) in a thirteen runner race. The first three horses will count as being placed in this race. The fraction of the win odds that you are paid out on can vary, but will always be clearly stated at the top of the race card. We will assume that the place odds are paid at one quarter (1/4) of the win odds for this race.

So, the race gets under way and your horse is running prominently. With a furlong to go, the horse has every chance of winning but begins to fade and finishes in third position. The win part of your bet will be a losing wager. Your place bet will have won.

If you had made a £10 each-way bet on this race, the bet would have cost you £20. That’s £10 to win and £10 to place. The first bet is lost, so we just need to work out how much we win on our place bet.

Fractions

At one quarter of the win odds, our place bet pays out at 2.50 (6/4). £10 x 2.50 = £25. That would be our total return. The total amount we bet was £20, so we have made a £5 profit here. How much would have we won, if our horse had won the race?

The place part of our bet remains the same and would have won £25. The win part of our bet would have won £100 (£10 x 10.00). Of course, if the horse had won, we would have made more money if we had bet the whole £20 on it to win. If we had done that, our return would have been £200.

A Matter Of Preference

Punters are divided about whether or not each-way bets are a good idea. For many, they believe that betting this way reduces variance. You are much more likely to get some kind of return and you reduce the risk of busting your betting bankroll. Others feel that you should only ever back horses to win. It is a matter of personal choice and there is no right or wrong way to bet.

Whether you want to bet each-way, or make single bets, look no further than RaceBets!

Join RaceBets And Claim Your Welcome Bonus Now!
sign up to racebets now